The regional economic impact of Brexit to date: many losers, few winners

Warwick University Econometrics Research Report – July 2020

The authors find that the negative impact of Brexit on the economy is larger in areas where :

a) more people voted to leave

b) the manufacturing sector is more prominent

c) there are higher numbers of low skilled workers.

Maps of UK showing which areas have been most and least affected by Brexit so far.
Warwick University Research

Brexit transition status: If you must Brexit, think it through first!

The government’s preparations for regulatory trade negotiations are less advanced than they should be. Discussions are still taking place within government on the UK’s position on a number of important regulatory issues. This creates a real risk that the government will be pushed into making concessions it shouldn’t – or will fail to make concessions it should. The government should address this by making sure it knows what it is willing to accept and what would cause it to walk away from the table.

The government will find it easier to resist pressure from trading partners if it has a more coherent idea of its regulatory strategy. While all regulations are different, there are often common principles underlying them (for example, the precautionary principle). Some governments have set out their strategy as regards these cross-cutting issues in public documents, such as the European Commission’s 2000 Communication on the Precautionary Principle. The UK should do the same as a way of setting its independent regulatory policy on a solid footing.

Extracts from the Institute of Government’s Trade and Regulation after Brexit report – August 2020

The Independent says:

Brexit: Boris Johnson’s promise of lucrative trade deals in trouble, study warns

PM vowed to ‘take back control’ – but dithering has handed advantage to countries on other side of the table, Institute for Government says.

Phil Moorhouse’s view